WHAT INDIA CAN LEARN FROM THE BEST LAW & ORDER ENFORCEMENTS AROUND THE WORLD

Recently, in Bangalore, the Southernmost IT hub in India, a special committee in the city presented suggestions for the city's safety plan: that includes marked 'danger zones', support centers for rape survivors, strict amendment of laws related to sexual assaults and revamped police stations.

While it may be a positive sign that things are finally moving in the direction of curbing crimes against women, it may be insightful to know what other countries are doing to tackle such gender-based crimes.

How are other countries handling crimes against women?

Finland: Reliable helpline & no corruption in Police leading to a low 22.92% crime rate

Finland has a crime rate of 22.92%, making it one of the safest places to live. The Finnish police have been known as one of the least corruptible forces in the world, anyone attempting to bribe them will be arrested. Finland also has a quick helpline number that allows citizens to reach out to them in times of emergency. 97% of all calls are answered within 4 seconds, while the operator can pick up the location of the caller within 6 seconds and send emergency units to the location.

Japan: Strong community presence and a low crime rate of 13.1%

With a crime rate of just 13.1%, Japan is safe to walk the streets during the day and the night. Their law enforcement system and the police force system is highly respected within the Japanese communities. They are often called upon to sort out family quarrels, minor disputes.

Georgia, USA: Accessible background checks, Crime Prevention Inspectors leading to a low crime rate of 19.6%

In Georgia, the crime rate is as low as 19.6%. What's notable about Georgia's police practice is that they help their citizens obtain a background check on any person, thereby lessening risks of crimes taking place. Each area in Georgia, has its own Crime Prevention inspectors who act as liaisons between the police and the general public to help prevent crimes and maintain law and order.

Singapore: Super organised Police Force, Strict Law enforcement leading to a low crime rate of 12.72%

Singapore's crime rates are reported to be around 12.72%, the law enforcement force is strict in the nation. The Singapore Police Force has a helpline that enables its citizens to reach out to them in case of emergencies, all calls are attempted to be answered within 10 seconds, and police arrive to assist at the scenario within 15 minutes of the call being placed. All urgent enquiries sent to the police force are answered within 3 working days, and victims of crime are kept updated within the first 7 days of the crime's investigation.

Denmark: Attorneys and Police work together, ensuring effective justice and a low crime rate of 23.21%

Denmark has a crime rate of 23.21%. With security for every Dane citizen being taken very seriously, there are 200 police officers for every 1000 citizens in an area. Denmark Police forces and the Denmark Public Prosecution service, work together to solve every criminal case that is registered, to ensure law and order is in place. The notable work of the Denmark Police force is that they act as counsellors for victims of crime.

When will India provide benefits of law, order & justice for all?

The above examples show us that with strong and solid police and law enforcement agencies, our country can also keep our crime rates in check

With threats of crime looming across our cities, it's high time our country spruced up our police and judicial systems. Apart from these fine examples listed above, gender sensitisation for our police and law agencies are the need of the hour and cannot be stressed upon enough.

Power Of 49 Manifesto

Before the elections started in 2014, Jaago Re launched a crowd-sourced 10-point manifesto about serious issues affecting women in India. We presented it to leading political parties and asked them to pay attention to our concerns.

One of the important points we raised was – Increase percentage of women police personnel from current 5% to at least 33%

Isn't it high time that the promised points from the Manifesto are now brought into action. What do you think? Do share your thoughts in the comment space below.

Sources: *Denmark Police Force, FBI, World Bank, Digital Agenda For Europe, Numbeo, Nation Master, Japan Police Force, Atlanta Police Department, Singapore Police Force.

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